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Announcing our Collett 14xx / 48xx / 58xx model

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  • Richard Dapol
    replied
    Hi MP, I am attaching part of the 1932 Swindon General arrangement drawing of the bunker, where supports for the sheeting are clearly shown. The separate sheets are then riveted to these supports. Also a picture of the bunker of preserved 1450, where separate sheets can be seen riveted to the internal supports, however I notice this small gap between the bunker side sheets on some preserved examples have been filled in, so would you please post a picture where you are stating no gap is visible.
    Thank you for your comment, we intend to produce highly detailed 48xx/58xx models
    Kind Regards,
    Richard

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  • Miss Prism
    replied
    On further examining the bunker sheeting on the 14xx, and the equivalent on Panniers, there is in fact no join at all - it's just a double line of rivets.

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  • Richard Dapol
    commented on 's reply
    Hi MP. Thank you for your observations regarding early drawings of this upcoming model. The washout plugs will be corrected as the join in the bunker sheeting will be redefined as a fine line. Also the top feed casing drat angle will be reduced to 1.5 degrees, really the minimum for safe removal from the mould.
    The cab floor is cast with the footplate, however the roof, which is held on by two small magnets, is a simple process to remove without taking anything apart. Towards the end of the month I hope to be able to post better drawings, but in the meantime your input is much appreciated.
    Regards, Richard

  • JeremiahBunyan
    commented on 's reply
    PM your feedback to Andy Dapol and/or Richard Dapol so that you'll know for sure that they have seen it and will act upon the same. With current model shows going on I think they'll be busy and they can overlook certain posts by mistake. So it's best to PM them too.

  • Miss Prism
    replied
    I understand the renderings shown on RMweb a week or so ago may have been somewhat premature, and that the CADs are still in a state of development. Nevertheless, here are some comments.

    Incorrect double washout plugs are shown on the rear of the boiler.



    The RMweb rendering seemed to show the top feed has a taper in side elevation. Although 14xx top feeds do have a very slight release angle in side elevation, it is not a significant angle (unlike a Pannier top feed). It is perhaps 1 or 2 degrees (which is what would be required as a release angle from a model's tooling anyway).









    The seam joint on the bunker side of the CAD rendering looked crude and unprototypical. It is barely discernible on the prototype.




    It was not possible to see the bufferbeam detail on the CAD rendering, but many of the fixings on the bufferbeams of the real thing are chunky hex boltheads (1" a/f??), and not snaphead rivets (as are shown in all other 14xx RTR models). These bolts were present on original build, and are not a 'preservation mod', although Didcot's 4866 does have a few more of them than the original locos did.




    Regarding the removable roof feature, I would have thought a better strategy would be to have the footplate floor as part of the chassis, thus locomotive crew could be placed on that. The prototype roof is nicely rounded. Just a personal view.



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  • Southernlad86
    replied
    Good news indeed looks like another pre order is Due :-D

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  • Andy Dapol
    started a topic Announcing our Collett 14xx / 48xx / 58xx model

    Announcing our Collett 14xx / 48xx / 58xx model

    Announced at the Telford O Gauge Guild exhibition, and currently about to go into tooling we expect this model to be available by September 2018.

    The 14XX was a GWR tank locomotive designed for branch line passenger and freight work. Although the design is attributed to Collett, much of the actual locomotive was derived from the earlier 19th century George Armstrong designed 517 Class. Entering service in 1932, in all 75 were built and ran well into the 1960s with 4 surviving into preservation.
    An autocoach was often combined with a 14XX on many branch line operations. The driving cab on the autocoach meant that the locomotive could be controlled from there and negated the requirement to run the locomotive round at the end of the journey. This format was known as a push-pull train.

    20 locomotives built concurrently with the 48xx engines were not fitted with auto train control connections. These 58xx class engines were intended for branch lines where auto working was not in use and goods train service. 58s were regularly seen hauling the last of the 4 wheel coaches and later bogie non-corridor coaches, often with just one brake composite being sufficient for the passengers.
    • Die-cast running plate
    • Fully compensated die-cast chassis
    • Die-cast and profiled wheels
    • High level of separately applied detail
    • Flickering fire light effect
    • Removable cab roof for ease of posing your locomotive crew
    • Sprung metal buffers and articulated screw coupling
    • Dapols proven motor and gearbox offering exceptional smooth performance and slow running capabilities
    • DCC Ready, incorporating Dapols new 'Quick-fit' DCC and speaker design
    • Un-numbered versions of each livery will be available so that you can model your local locomotive
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